A Tip for Making Shit Happen

There are any number of things you can do to make shit happen – that is to say, to be productive – and one of the major things I’ve learned that is the most helpful is this:

DRESS THE PART

Feeling successful and feeling confident helps you be more productive.

Don’t say, “when I get there [where ever it is you see yourself being when you’re successful] I’ll dress that way,” or

“I don’t have to get all dressed up, I’m not there yet.”

Take every opportunity to BE the person you think about becoming.

When I was working from home one of the things I made sure to do was get up in the morning, take a shower, put work clothes on, and then sit down at my desk in my living room. I wasn’t going to see anyone, or attend any meetings but I felt better, I did more.

Try it with me. Plan your clothes for the next few days. Who do you see when you think about being successful or productive? Are you in our pajama bottoms with a hoodie, or are you in a nice pair of jeans and a trendy sweater, or maybe it’s slacks and a button up shirt? It doesn’t matter if you don’t intend to leave your house – wear the clothes, and let them dictate what you will do for the day.

 


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5 Ways to Improve Your Happiness at Work

1. Do Your Part

Stop thinking it’s beneath you to do the menial tasks – there is someone who in your organization that believes the task is not menial, it is hard work to them.  My boss made a comment to me the other day about another co-worker, “quite frankly, she’s paid too much to be doing that.” Pay should not determine workload. We all need to be willing to do what we can when we can.

2. Keep It Clean

Much like “Do Your Part” above, you can’t leave it all up to someone else. If you have an employee kitchen or communal break space and you notice it’s dirty – clean it up. Think about it this way, “Do not put off doing anything that takes 60 seconds or less to do.” (And in most cases – a quick wipe down of the counter takes way less than 60 seconds)

3. Big Brother

You’ve seen that show right? Where people live in a house and for weeks are filmed every minute of every day? Nothing they do goes unnoticed? When you write an email, pretend your boss will be able to read it. When talking in the break room, imagine a camera just off in the distance. Act as if someone’s watching.   

4. Tap Out

This one is important on many levels, but few utilize its benefit. So often we’re afraid that asking for help or saying no displays laziness. But, ask yourself: “isn’t it better to do a few things really well, than to do too many things half-ass?” I think the answer is yes. So, when you are overwhelmed and the quality of your work is starting to suffer – tap out, say no, ask for help.

5. Accept Accidents & Mistakes

We all make mistakes; we’re human, but how often is the assumption that the mistakes and accidents made by co-workers are on purpose?  We all have times when – even though we know what we’re doing – we are too rushed, or maybe we’re confused by the situation. Allow your co-workers the benefit of the doubt, accept their mistakes as mistakes.

With these five simple rules, the atmosphere you work in should significantly change.

Which one do you think is the most important? And which one do you struggle with the most?  Tell me about it below in the comments page.

Transparency Tuesday: The Post-Op Appointment

Transparency Tuesday is a concept I’m experimenting with here on the blog. Each Tuesday my post will be about an issue I’m dealing with in my life on a personal level. Whether it’s about the business I have (finding influencers, the struggle with giving things away for nothing, going “bankrupt” the first 3 months I was in business, etc), or my own personal issues surrounding love, life and being a mom. I won’t be high-lighting anything; this is the real deal.


“We found a 4mm nodule on your left lung, at the top…. what we suggest is that you follow up with your primary care physician for a CT scan.” My heart was pounding, way more than it had been in the week prior.

I had noticed something was weird on Thursday after my appendix surgery. I was short of breath walking up one flight of stairs, and I had these weird twinges of pain in my chest. I wrote it off as anxiety because I was about to get on a plane for New York. I was beyond excited so I figured the excitement was causing me to be acutely sensitive.

It was still pretty bothersome in New York. My friend Stephanie and I would be walking around the city and I could barely have a conversation with her between breaths. I blamed it on my surgery because, in all honesty, I wasn’t sure if it was (or could be) the culprit. I knew my follow up appointment was May 1st, so I waited it out. However, the chest pain and the shortness of breath weren’t changing.

When I got to my appointment they looked at my incisions, poked around, and then asked, “do you have any other concerns?”

“I have a hard time catching my breath and when I take in deep breaths my chest hurts.” I put my hand on the right side of my chest.

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